Album Review: Big Talk’s Debut Album Is a Fun but Forgettable Effort

big talk cover Album Review: Big Talks Debut Album Is a Fun but Forgettable Effort

And so Ronnie Vannucci comes crashing into the rock music scene, proving his place as a solo artist and talented musician.  The Killers’ drummer and Jason-Lee-lookalike releases the self-titled, debut album from his solo group, Big Talk, comprised of Vannucci on vocals, guitar, drums, bass, and keyboard and Taylor Milne on lead guitar and back-up vocals.

As a whole, Big Talk is a fun, energetic album distinguished by a clear rock feel with a breath of country influences and a catchy, danceable, electro-pop whisper.  If you wanted to define it by comparison, it has the playfulness and the quick pacing of, say, Eagles of Death Metal and the bluesy-ness of The Black Keys (with a little less bass definition).  At times, it has the alt-y growl of The Foo Fighters, the classic rock sound of something Tom Petty or Springsteen influenced, and the youthful pop-rock appeal of Neon Trees.

bigtalk Album Review: Big Talks Debut Album Is a Fun but Forgettable Effort

Ronnie Vannucci’s solo album is a much more solid effort than Killers frontman Brandon Flowers’, but , in all honesty, is not very groundbreaking.  The generic rock riffs aren’t complemented by remarkable vocals or radical combinations of sounds, and the synth background is hardly detectable (though a fun touch when it is)—most likely to avoid sounding like The Killers.  That said, the album is fun, listenable, upbeat, and enjoyable–a good, easy group listen that will satisfy a mixture of musical preferences.  It will have my attention for an ample amount of time, it just won’t necessarily influence the way I listen and view music.